Online Dictionary of Mental Health
Top Ten Bestsellers (continuously updated): abuse, adhd, adoption, aging, aids, alcoholism, alternative medicine, anxiety disorders, autism, bipolar disorder, child development, child care, conversion disorders, counseling psychology, cults, death and dying, depression, dissociative disorders, domestic violence, dreams, eating disorders, forensic psychology, gay, lesbian & bisexual, grief, learning disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, parenting, personality disorders, professional counseling and psychotherapy, psychiatry, psychopathy, PTSD, rape, schizophrenia, sexual disorders, self-esteem, self-help, stress, suicide, violence.

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Book Selections

Talking With Children About Loss


Multisystemic Treatment of Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents


ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management


The Young Adolescent: Clinical Studies


Diagnostic Assessment in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology


Adolescent Breakdown and Beyond


Understanding Aggressive Behavior in Children


Adolescent Drug & Alcohol Abuse


Killer Kids


Innovative Psychotherapy Techniques in Child and Adolescent Therapy


Trauma and Adolescence


Bridging Worlds : Understanding and Facilitating Adolescent Recovery from the
Trauma of Abuse



Handbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry


Group Therapy With Troubled Youth


Handbook of Adolescent Psychopathology


The Clinical Interview of the Adolescent


Treating the Unmanageable Adolescent


Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder : Help for Children and Adolescents


Young People and Mental Health


Learned Optimism


How to Raise Your Self-Esteem


The Highly Sensitive Person's Workbook


The Psychology of the Internet


What You Can Change... and What You Can't


Malignant Sadness: The Anatomy of Depression


Play Therapy


Teaching Social Skills to Children and Youth


The Play Therapy Primer


Treating School-Age Children


Handbook of Clinical Intervention in Child Sexual Abuse


Children's Rights, Therapists' Responsibilities


Handbook of Child Behavior Therapy in the Psychiatric Setting


The Bipolar Child


Activity Schedules for Children With Autism


Straight Talk About Psychiatric Medications for Kids


The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Treatment Planner


Targeting Autism


Teaching Children With Autism to Mind-Read


Running on Ritalin


Asperger Syndrome


Children With Autism and Asperger Syndrome


Ritalin Nation


Diagnosing Learning Disorders


DSM-IV Diagnosis in the Schools


Children and Grief: When a Parent Dies


Child Psychopathology


Autism : Understanding the Disorder


No-Talk Therapy for Children and Adolescents


Brief Child Therapy Homework Planner


Child & Adolescent Psychopharmacology


Assessment of Childhood Disorders


Interviewing Children and Adolescents


Cognitive Therapy With Children and Adolescents


Life on the Edge: Parenting a Child With ADD/ADHD


Asperger's Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals


EMDR: The Breakthrough Therapy for Overcoming Anxiety, Stress, and Trauma


Clinician's Thesaurus : The Guidebook for Writing Psychological Reports


The Batterer : A Psychological Profile


Anxiety Disorders and Phobias: A Cognitive Perspective


Looking into the Eyes of a Killer


MMPI-2: Assessing Personality and Psychopathology


The Psychology of Stalking


Research Design in Clinical Psychology


Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision


The First Interview : Revised for DSM-IV


Shy Children, Phobic Adults: Nature and Treatment of Social Phobia


Insider's Guide to Mental Health: Resources Online


Studying the Clinician


Assessing Psychological Trauma and PTSD


Mental Disorders in Older Adults


Rapid Psychological Assessment


Essentials of Millon Inventories Assessment


Genetics of Mental Disorders: A Guide for Students, Clinicians, and
Researchers



Case Studies in Abnormal Psychology


Psychiatric Rehabilitation


Recovered Memories of Abuse


Assessing Outcomes in Clinical Practice


Don't Panic: Taking Control of Anxiety Attacks


Lost in the Mirror: An Inside Look at Borderline Personality Disorder


Narcissism: Denial of the True Self


Blaming the Brain: The Truth About Drugs and Mental Health


The Biology of Violence


Traumatic Stress : The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on Mind, Body, and
Society



Betrayal by the Brain: The Neurologic Basis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome,
Fibromyalgia Syndrome, and Related Neural Network Disorders



Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears



The Anatomy of Motive


Psychological Evaluations for the Courts


Eyewitness Testimony


The Mad, the Bad, and the Innocent


Essentials of Forensic Psychological Assessment


A Primer in the Psychology of Crime


Establishing a Forensic Psychiatric Practice


The Psychologist as Expert Witness


Conducting Insanity Evaluations


Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts


First Person Plural: My Life As a Multiple


Out of the Shadows : Understanding Sexual Addiction


The Complete Adult Psychotherapy Treatment Planner


On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy


Autism and Asperger Syndrome


A Mood Apart : The Thinker's Guide to Emotion and Its Disorders


Amongst Ourselves : A Self-Help Guide to Living With Dissociative Identity
Disorder



Diagnostic Criteria from DSM-IV


Essential Psychopathology and Its Treatment


Bipolar Disorder: A Guide for Patients and Families


I Hate You-Don't Leave Me


Suicide and Attempted Suicide: Methods and Consequences


Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Among Us


Attention Deficit Disorder: A Different Perception


DSM-IV Made Easy: The Clinician's Guide to Diagnosis


An End to Panic: Breakthrough Techniques for Overcoming Panic Disorder


DSM-IV Casebook


The Boy Who Couldn't Stop Washing


The Broken Mirror : Understanding and Treating Body Dysmorphic Disorder


The Abusive Personality


Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds and Confusión de
Confusiones



The Suicidal Mind


Phantom Illness : Recognizing, Understanding, and Overcoming Hypochondria


Your Mental Health: A Layman's Guide to the Psychiatrist's Bible


Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry


Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions


Neuropsychological Assessment


Essential Psychopharmacology


Cults in Our Midst


ELECTROSHOCK: Restoring the Mind


Making Us Crazy


The Harvard Guide to Psychiatry


Clinical Assessment of Malingering and Deception


Kaplan & Sadock's Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry


Pocket Handbook of Clinical Psychiatry


A Guide to Treatments That Work


The Antidepressant Era


Handbook of Normative Data for Neuropsychological Assessment


Dual Diagnosis: Counseling the Mentally Ill Substance Abuser


Harm Reduction: Pragmatic Strategies for Managing High-Risk Behaviors


Juvenile Sexual Offending: Causes, Consequences, and Correction


Crisis Intervention Strategies


Clinician's Handbook, The: Integrated Diagnostics, Assessment, and
Intervention in Adult and Adolescent Psychopathology



Handbook of Clinical Psychopharmacology for Therapists


The Biochemical Basis of Neuropharmacology


The Psychotherapist's Guide to Psychopharmacology


Principles of Addiction Medicine


From Placebo to Panacea : Putting Psychiatric Drugs to the Test


The Behavioral Medicine Treatment Planner


Medicating Schizophrenia: A History


Principles and Practice of Psychopharmacotherapy


Drugs and Human Behavior


Drugs of Abuse and Addiction


The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy


Therapist's Guide to Clinical Intervention


Brief Therapy Homework Planner


The Couples Psychotherapy Treatment Planner


Brief Adolescent Therapy Homework Planner


The Harvard Medical School Guide to Suicide Assessment and Intervention


Anorexia, Murder, and Suicide


The Cruelest Death : The Enigma of Adolescent Suicide


Why We Get Sick : The New Science of Darwinian Medicine
by Randolph   Nesse, George Williams

Why We Get SickIs our tendency to "fix" our bodies with medicine keeping them from working exactly as they're supposed to? Two pioneers of the emerging science of Darwinian medicine argue that illness is part and parcel of the evolutionary system and as such, may be helping us to evolve towards better adaptation to our environment.

From Booklist , January 1, 1995
Although they realize that evolution selects not for health but for reproductive success, the Darwinian physicians of Nesse and Williams' trope see the body as "a bundle of careful compromises." These Darwinians also see trouble-causing genes as those that combine good and bad features because they have not adapted completely from their Stone Age purposes to the diverse demands of today's environment and ways of living. Physicians should look for the evolutionary, not the proximate, causes of disease, Darwinians say. For example, the gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, which is most often seen in malaria-ridden areas, actually protects the individual who has it from malaria (and now, apart from in areas endangered by malaria, this gene is decreasing in frequency). When physicians look at allergy, cancer, even mental diseases, through Darwinian eyes they see and, Nesse and Williams say, will increasingly see medical problems in a new and thought-provoking light. Why We Get Sick deserves pondering by both physicians and laypersons. William Beatty
Copyright© 1995, American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews , November 15, 1994
Some surprising answers to questions about why our bodies are designed the way they are and why we get the diseases we do. Nesse, a physician (Psychiatry/Univ. of Michigan) and Williams (Ecology and Evolution/SUNY, Stony Brook) first teamed up to write an article on Darwinian medicine, which applies the concept of adaptation by natural selection to medical questions. That article, published in 1991 in The Quarterly Review of Biology, has been expanded into the present book, in which the authors look at the design characteristics of the human body that make it susceptible to disease. Their conclusions? First, sometimes it's our genes that make us vulnerable to disease. Some genetic defects arise through mutations, but more often, genes with deleterious effects are maintained through natural selection because their benefits outweigh their costs. Second, there's a mismatch between our present environment and the one that over thousands of years shaped our hunter-gatherer ancestors. There simply hasn't been time for our bodies to adapt, and we suffer the consequences. Third, disease results from design compromises. For example, the structural changes that allowed us to develop from horizontal four-footed creatures to upright two-footed ones left us vulnerable to back problems. Fourth, our evolutionary history has left us some troublesome legacies, such as the unfortunate intersection in our throats of the passages for food and air. Some of the areas Nesse and Williams apply their Darwinian approach to are infectious diseases, allergies, cancer, aging, reproduction, and mental disorders. Happily, they write with impeccable clarity, and when they are speculating (which they do freely), they are careful to say so. They also offer numerous suggestions for research studies, thoughtful proposals for reshaping medical textbooks and medical education, and a scenario dramatizing Darwinian medicine's possible clinical application. Fascinating reading for doctors and patients alike. -- Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Edward O. Wilson, author of Naturalist
By bringing the evolutionary vision systematically into one of the last unconquered provinces, Nesse and Williams have devised not only means for the improvement of medicine but fundamental new insights into the human condition.

Customers who bought this book also bought:


Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers : An Updated Guide to Stress, Stress-Related Diseases, and Coping
by Robert M. Sapolsky

Why Zebras Don't Get UlcersWhy don't zebras get ulcers--or heart disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases--when people do? In a fascinating look at the science of stress, biologist Robert Sapolsky presents an intriguing case, that people develop such diseases partly because our bodies aren't designed for the constant stresses of a modern-day life--like sitting in daily traffic jams or growing up in poverty. Rather, they seem more built for the kind of short-term stress faced by a zebra--like outrunning a lion.

With wit, graceful writing, and a sprinkling of Far Side cartoons, Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers makes understanding the science of stress an adventure in discovery. "This book is a primer about stress, stress-related disease, and the mechanisms of coping with stress. How is it that our bodies can adapt to some stressful emergencies, while other ones make us sick? Why are some of us especially vulnerable to stress-related diseases, and what does that have to do with our personalities?"

Sapolsky, a Stanford University neuroscientist, explores stress's role in heart disease, diabetes, growth retardation, memory loss, and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. He cites tantalizing studies of hyenas, baboons, and rodents, as well as of people of different cultures, to vividly make his points. And Sapolsky concludes with a hopeful chapter, titled "Managing Stress." Although he doesn't subscribe to the school of thought that hope cures all disease, Sapolsky highlights the studies that suggest we do have some control over stress-related ailments, based on how we perceive the stress and the kinds of social support we have.

Customers who bought this book also bought:


Dsm-IV Casebook : A Learning Companion to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
by Robert L. Spitzer, Miriam Gibbon, Andrew E. Skodol

DSM Case BookThe DSM IV Casebook facilitates the transition from the concepts and terms of the DSM IV to actual clinical situations by providing vignettes for illustration and study.

Booknews, Inc. , August 1, 1994
A collection of case accounts of real patients, edited to focus on information relevant to differential diagnosis. Each case is followed by a discussion of the differential diagnosis, made according to the diagnostic criteria in DSM-IV. The discussions include important diagnostic considerations, such as the rationale for making each particular diagnosis, other disorders to be considered in formulating each diagnosis, and, in some cases, recognition of diagnostic uncertainty because of inadequate information, ambiguity in the clinical features, or problems in the classification itself. Paper edition (675-9), $29.25. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

Customers who bought this book also bought:


Mind-Body Deceptions : The Psychosomatics of Everyday Life
by Steven L. Dubovsky

Mind Body DeceptionsFrom Kirkus Reviews , January 15, 1997
An ambitious and confoundingly uneven exploration of psychobiological interdependence. Dubovsky (Psychiatry and Medicine/Univ. of Colorado Medical School) is onto something--but not the rhetorically loaded ``deceptions'' of the title, into which frame the text is force-fit at some cost to clarity and credibility. The business of the book is examining mind-body connections and their implications for health and health care by explaining psychodynamic and biochemical actions and interactions and exposing prevailing misconceptions and their ramifications. It opens with padded conventional wisdom asserting the overlap of mental and physical processes, then usefully introduces the phenomena of somatization and psychosomatic illness as physiological expressions of emotional pain. In the gray area of depression, all ambiguities are veiled by a confident schematic rendering of the intimate correlation between mind and body systems at the level of the synapse: If maladaptive emotional behavior becomes automatic after repeated episodes of stress (a process known as ``kindling''), healthy brain circuits atrophy. That elucidation of brain biochemistry, like the descriptions of the workings of the cardiovascular and immunological systems in the later section on heart disease and cancer, presupposes a degree of scientific literacy discontinuous with the popular tenor and thrust of the psychological models and the casual assimilation of supportive research; the result is at once overtechnical and oversimplifying. Dubovsky writes sentiently, however, about psychosocial resources for medical patients, and saliently about how the managed-care industry both reflects and perpetuates the traditional mind-body dichotomy. At his judicious best--respecting the multiplicity of psychobiological events and responses, or cautioning against the very cognitive leaps he seems subtly prone to make--he does contribute to the substance and dimension of a fascinating discussion. For the shelf well-stocked with other perspectives. -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

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A History of Psychiatry : From the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac
by Edward Shorter

A History of PsychiatryThe history of madness and its treatment is a fascinating one. At one time, the mentally ill were diagnosed as demonically possessed; later, when mental illness became the province of psychoanalysts, those conditions that are actually physical in nature, such as schizophrenia or manic depression, went insufficiently treated, their sufferers consigned to asylums. In his book, A History of Psychiatry, Edward Shorter, a medical historian at the University of Toronto, presents a concise chronology of mental illness and its treatment. Shorter favors a biological understanding of these disorders, concentrating on medical approaches to helping the seriously mentally ill. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

The New York Times Book Review, Vivian Dent
Biological psychiatry deserves a history that gives credit to its achievements; Mr. Shorter's book achieves this goal. But to the extent that psychiatry deals with both the physical and the psychological, and with their place in the social world, his book falls short. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

From Booklist , January 1, 1997
Shorter's social history of 200 years of psychiatry in the U.S., Great Britain, France, and Germany is informative and at times lively. It begins with the asylums of the eighteenth century, showing that they did some good until they were overwhelmed by increasing numbers of patients. The first round of biological psychiatry in the nineteenth century involved initial attempts to connect mental conditions with parts of the body; with this material Shorter does particularly well as he compares, in terms of both theories and treatments, the centralized national system of psychiatry in France with the separate institutes and private clinics in Germany. The nineteenth century also saw the emergence of patients' power when diagnoses of "madness" were refused and preference given those of various "nervous conditions." As for psychoanalysis, Shorter pillories it and then delineates the second round of biological psychiatry involving genetics and the growth of neuroscience. Dealing ably with the major trends, Shorter does not fail to also illuminate such engaging and horrifying byways as the "fever cure" and ice pick lobotomy. William Beatty
Copyright© 1997, American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

From Kirkus Reviews , December 1, 1996
An opinionated, anecdote-rich history of a branch of medicine strongly shaped by culture. Canadian physician and medical historian Shorter (Univ. of Toronto) begins his lively account by describing the horrific treatment of the mentally ill before the advent of the custodial asylum. It was, he says, the discovery that asylums could have a therapeutic role that led to the birth of psychiatry at the end of the 18th century. Shorter examines the failure of the therapeutic asylum movement, attributing it largely to an overwhelming number of inmates in the 19th century. Always divided by two visions of mental illness, one finding its origins in the biology of the brain and the other looking to psychosocial factors, psychiatry was dominated by the biological view throughout the 19th century. Shorter presents the German physician Emil Kraepelin, who revolutionized the approach to categorizing and diagnosing mental illnesses, as the central figure in ending the sway of biological psychiatry. As for Freud, says Shorter, ``His doctrine of psychoanalysis, based on intuitive leaps of fantasy, did not stand the test of time.'' Citing studies indicating that the majority of American psychoanalysts and their patients were Jewish, the author links the growing social assimilation of Jews (and their abandonment of their ``encapsulated little subculture'') with the post-'60s decline in popularity of psychoanalysis--a theory sure to arouse controversy. Shorter chronicles the discovery of the various drugs that formed the pharmacological basis of the new biological psychiatry and hails the alliance of psychiatrists with geneticists, biochemists, and other scientists that has brought the scientific method to the investigation of mental illness. Where does psychiatry go from here? Shorter predicts a combination of the neuroscientific and the psychotherapeutic, that is, a blend of ``neurochem'' and ``neurochat.'' While psychiatrists may quibble and Freudians and other psychoanalysts will surely squawk, those without a vested interest will be thoroughly entertained and certainly enlightened. -- Copyright ©1996, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

Customers who bought this book also bought:


Emotional Intelligence
by Daniel P. Goleman

Emotional IntelligenceThere was a time when IQ was considered the leading determinant of success. In this fascinating book, based on brain and behavioral research, Daniel Goleman argues that our IQ-idolizing view of intelligence is far too narrow. Instead, Goleman makes the case for "emotional intelligence" being the strongest indicator of human success. He defines emotional intelligence in terms of self-awareness, altruism, personal motivation, empathy, and the ability to love and be loved by friends, partners, and family members. People who possess high emotional intelligence are the people who truly succeed in work as well as play, building flourishing careers and lasting, meaningful relationships. Because emotional intelligence isn't fixed at birth, Goleman outlines how adults as well as parents of young children can sow the seeds.

Synopsis
The astounding coast-to-coast bestseller--with more than 750,000 copies in print--that has changed readers' understanding of what it really means to be smart, Emotional Intelligence delineates the five crucial skills of emotional intelligence and shows why these determine success in relationships, work, and even physical well-being. "Strikes a blow . . . for both science and common sense."--The Philadelphia Inquirer.

From the Publisher
Everyone knows that high IQ is no guarantee of success, happiness, or virtue, but until Emotional Intelligence, we could only guess why. Daniel Goleman's brilliant report from the frontiers of psychology and neuroscience offers startling new insight into our "two minds"--the rational and the emotional--and how they together shape our destiny.

Through vivid examples, Goleman delineates the five crucial skills of emotional intelligence, and shows how they determine our success in relationships, work, and even our physical well-being. What emerges is an entirely new way to talk about being smart.

The best news is that "emotional literacy" is not fixed early in life. Every parent, every teacher, every business leader, and everyone interested in a more civil society, has a stake in this compelling vision of human possibility.


Working With Emotional Intelligence
by Daniel P. Goleman

Working With Emotional IntelligenceWorking With Emotional Intelligence takes the concepts from Daniel Goleman's bestseller, Emotional Intelligence, into the workplace. Business leaders and outstanding performers are not defined by their IQs or even their job skills, but by their "emotional intelligence": a set of competencies that distinguishes how people manage feelings, interact, and communicate. Analyses done by dozens of experts in 500 corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations worldwide conclude that emotional intelligence is the barometer of excellence on virtually any job. This book explains what emotional intelligence is and why it counts more than IQ or expertise for excelling on the job. It details 12 personal competencies based on self-mastery (such as accurate self-assessment, self-control, initiative, and optimism) and 13 key relationship skills (such as service orientation, developing others, conflict management, and building bonds). Goleman includes many examples and anecdotes--from Fortune 500 companies to a nonprofit preschool--that show how these competencies lead to or thwart success.

Unlike IQ, emotional intelligence can keep growing--it continues to develop with life experiences. Understanding and raising your emotional intelligence is essential to your success and leadership potential. This book is an excellent resource for learning how to accomplish this. --Joan Price

Customers who bought this book also bought:


I Don't Want to Talk About It : Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression
by Terrence Real

I don't want to talk about itA therapist himself, Terrence Real examines the dirty little secret of the American Male: chronic depression. As the author sees it, men who fall prey to depressive disorders are caught in a double bind. Since their feelings of helplessness are considered unmanly, they tend to hide them, which makes the descent into blackness even steeper. The solution? Real urges men (and women!) to cast aside their clichéd notions of gender and to accept that feelings are neither masculine nor feminine but essentially human. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

Health and Fitness Editor's Recommended Book
When Terrence Real was studying to be a therapist, he accepted the notion that women suffered depression at rates several times that of men. Now he believes that conventional wisdom is wrong, that there has been a great cultural cover-up of depression in men. Real is convinced of the existence of a mental illness that is passed from fathers to sons in the form of rage, workaholism, distanced relationships from loved ones, and self-destructive behaviors ranging from stupid choices at work and in love to drug and alcohol abuse. Men reading I Don't Want to Talk About It will probably recognize themselves in every chapter, while women will recognize their partners--and, of course, both sexes will see their fathers in a new light.

The New York Times Book Review, Carol Gilligan
Mr. Real has the eye and ear of a novelist.... This is a hopeful and important book because it shows a way out of depression for men that carries with it a potential for ending a legacy of violence. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

From Booklist , January 1, 1997
In our culture, men are supposed to be tough and stoic, revealing few emotions. But that is a facade, psychotherapist Real argues. Many men are suffering a great deal of pain, even to the point of depression, yet their very training as males keeps it hidden, forcing them into denial. Using case studies and examples from his own life, Real examines "covert depression," where men try to ease their pain through such abusive behaviors as overwork and alcoholism. He convincingly argues that covert depression is in fact a disease, even though the medical community has yet to recognize it as such. He then discusses the different traumas that might lead to covert depression, the disease's many manifestations, and ways to recognize it, face up to it, and begin to heal. Part self-help, part cultural critique, this useful book will also be a welcome addition to men's movement literature. Brian McCombie
Copyright© 1997, American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

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Our Babies, Ourselves : How Biology and Culture Shape the Way We Parent
by Meredith F. Small

Our Babies, OurselvesHow we raise our children differs greatly from society to society, with many cultures responding differently to such questions as how a parent should respond to a crying child, how often a baby should be nursed, and at what age a child should learn to sleep alone. Ethnopediatrics--the study of parents, children, and child rearing across cultures--is the subject of anthropologist Meredith F. Small's thorough and fascinating book Our Babies, Ourselves.

Small asserts that our ideas about how to raise our kids are as much a result of our culture as our biology, and that, in fact, many of the values we place on child-rearing practices are based in culture rather than biology. Small writes, "Every act by parents, every goal that molds that act, has a foundation in what is appropriate for that particular culture. In this sense, no parenting style is 'right' and no style is 'wrong.' It is appropriate or inappropriate only according to the culture." Our Babies, Ourselves is a wonderful read for anyone interested in the social sciences, and will be especially meaningful to those swept up in the wild adventure of parenting. --Ericka Lutz

Book Description
"In the winter of 1995, in a dimly lit room in Atlanta, Georgia, I witnessed a birth. Not the birth of a baby, but of a new science, ethnopediatrics." Thus begins Meredith Small's new, groundbreaking book on the study of parents and infants across cultures and the way different caretaking styes affect the health, well-being, and survival of infants. Pediatricians, child development researchers, and anthropologists today have turned their research efforts to studying this new science of why we parent our children the way we do.

Each culture, and often each family, offers advice and directives on the right and wrong way to raise and care for infants, from feeding, interaction, emotional support, sleeping, and more. Yet scientists are finding that what we are taught is the right way to parent our children is based on nothing more than cultural directives--and may even run directly counter to a baby's biological needs. Should a child be encouraged to sleep alone from an early age, as parents do here in the U.S.? Is breastfeeding better than bottlefeeding, or is that just the myth of the '90s? How frequently should children be nursed--or does it matter? Do children in all cultures develop colic? How do mothers in different cultures respond to a crying baby? And how important to our infants' ultimate development is it to talk, sing, and interact with them? These are but a few of the questions Meredith Small, through the research emerging from this new science, answers--and the answers are not only surprising, but may even change the way that we think and go about raising our children.

Written for general audiences and parents alike, Our Babies, Ourselves shows what makes us bring up our kids the way we do--and what is actually best for babies.

Card catalog description
"In the winter of 1995, in a dimly lit room in Atlanta, Georgia, I witnessed a birth. Not the birth of a baby, but of a new science, ethnopediatrics." Thus begins Dr. Meredith F. Small's new book on the study of parents and infants across cultures and the way different caretaking styles affect the health, well-being, and survival of infants. Each culture, and often each family, offers advice and directives on the right and wrong way to raise and care for infants, from feeding, interaction, and emotional support to mandating what is normal in terms of infant sleeping, crying, and more. Yet scientists are finding that what we are taught is the right way to parent our children is often based on nothing more than cultural tradition - and may even run counter to a baby's biological needs. Written for parents and science lovers alike, Our Babies, Ourselves shows what makes us bring up our kids the way we doand what is actually best for babies.

Customers who bought this book also bought:


Breaking the Patterns of Depression
by Michael D. Yapko

Breaking the Patterns of DepressionOffers depressives skills for understanding and ultimately averting the recurring cycles of depression, including more than one hundred structured activities that show how to solve problems and use self-knowledge to stay out of hurtful situations.

Psychologist Michael Yapko explains that in order to find relief, more than the current episode of depression must be examined. He presents skills that will help readers understand and ultimately avert depression's recurring cycles. Focusing on future prevention as well as initial treatment, the book includes over 100 structured activities to help suffers learn the skills necessary to becoming and remaining depression-free.

Card catalog description
Have you ever felt so depressed that you had trouble concentrating on your job, talking with your family, even getting out of bed? Twenty to thirty million Americans suffer from some form of diagnosable depression, and their ranks are growing. Psychologist Michael D. Yapko explains that in order to find relief, more than the current episode of depression must be examined. In Breaking the Patterns of Depression, he presents skills that will help you understand and ultimately avert depression's recurring cycles. Focusing on future prevention as well as initial treatment, the book includes over one hundred activities to help you learn the skills necessary for becoming and remaining depression-free. Realistic and enormously helpful, Breaking the Patterns of Depression allows you to recognize your triggers for depression and, best of all, to clarify what you can do about them. With this knowledge in hand, you can control your depression rather than having your depression control you.

Midwest Book Review
Clinical psychologist and depression expert Yapko provides the latest evidence that depression is more a product of learning than a biological reaction, and his book helps sufferers systematically diffuse patterns which contribute to and encourage depression. Over a hundred easy self-help exercises place the knowledge and ability to control depressions squarely in the sufferers' hands, exploring the problem-solving skills necessary to achieve control. Case history examples fuel discussions.

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Book Selections

Talking With Children About Loss


Multisystemic Treatment of Antisocial Behavior in Children and Adolescents


ADHD with Comorbid Disorders: Clinical Assessment and Management


The Young Adolescent: Clinical Studies


Diagnostic Assessment in Child and Adolescent Psychopathology


Adolescent Breakdown and Beyond


Understanding Aggressive Behavior in Children


Adolescent Drug & Alcohol Abuse


Killer Kids


Innovative Psychotherapy Techniques in Child and Adolescent Therapy


Trauma and Adolescence


Bridging Worlds : Understanding and Facilitating Adolescent Recovery from the
Trauma of Abuse



Handbook of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry


Group Therapy With Troubled Youth


Handbook of Adolescent Psychopathology


The Clinical Interview of the Adolescent


Treating the Unmanageable Adolescent


Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder : Help for Children and Adolescents


Young People and Mental Health


Learned Optimism


How to Raise Your Self-Esteem


The Highly Sensitive Person's Workbook


The Psychology of the Internet


What You Can Change... and What You Can't


Malignant Sadness: The Anatomy of Depression


Play Therapy


Teaching Social Skills to Children and Youth


The Play Therapy Primer


Treating School-Age Children


Handbook of Clinical Intervention in Child Sexual Abuse


Children's Rights, Therapists' Responsibilities


Handbook of Child Behavior Therapy in the Psychiatric Setting


The Bipolar Child


Activity Schedules for Children With Autism


Straight Talk About Psychiatric Medications for Kids


The Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Treatment Planner


Targeting Autism


Teaching Children With Autism to Mind-Read


Running on Ritalin


Asperger Syndrome


Children With Autism and Asperger Syndrome


Ritalin Nation


Diagnosing Learning Disorders


DSM-IV Diagnosis in the Schools


Children and Grief: When a Parent Dies


Child Psychopathology


Autism : Understanding the Disorder


No-Talk Therapy for Children and Adolescents


Brief Child Therapy Homework Planner


Child & Adolescent Psychopharmacology


Assessment of Childhood Disorders


Interviewing Children and Adolescents


Cognitive Therapy With Children and Adolescents


Life on the Edge: Parenting a Child With ADD/ADHD


Asperger's Syndrome: A Guide for Parents and Professionals


EMDR: The Breakthrough Therapy for Overcoming Anxiety, Stress, and Trauma


Clinician's Thesaurus : The Guidebook for Writing Psychological Reports


The Batterer : A Psychological Profile


Anxiety Disorders and Phobias: A Cognitive Perspective


Looking into the Eyes of a Killer


MMPI-2: Assessing Personality and Psychopathology


The Psychology of Stalking


Research Design in Clinical Psychology


Fundamentals of Clinical Supervision


The First Interview : Revised for DSM-IV


Shy Children, Phobic Adults: Nature and Treatment of Social Phobia


Insider's Guide to Mental Health: Resources Online


Studying the Clinician


Assessing Psychological Trauma and PTSD


Mental Disorders in Older Adults


Rapid Psychological Assessment


Essentials of Millon Inventories Assessment


Genetics of Mental Disorders: A Guide for Students, Clinicians, and
Researchers



Case Studies in Abnormal Psychology


Psychiatric Rehabilitation


Recovered Memories of Abuse


Assessing Outcomes in Clinical Practice


Don't Panic: Taking Control of Anxiety Attacks


Lost in the Mirror: An Inside Look at Borderline Personality Disorder


Narcissism: Denial of the True Self


Blaming the Brain: The Truth About Drugs and Mental Health


The Biology of Violence


Traumatic Stress : The Effects of Overwhelming Experience on Mind, Body, and
Society



Betrayal by the Brain: The Neurologic Basis of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome,
Fibromyalgia Syndrome, and Related Neural Network Disorders



Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears



The Anatomy of Motive


Psychological Evaluations for the Courts


Eyewitness Testimony


The Mad, the Bad, and the Innocent


Essentials of Forensic Psychological Assessment


A Primer in the Psychology of Crime


Establishing a Forensic Psychiatric Practice


The Psychologist as Expert Witness


Conducting Insanity Evaluations


Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts


First Person Plural: My Life As a Multiple


Out of the Shadows : Understanding Sexual Addiction


The Complete Adult Psychotherapy Treatment Planner


On Becoming a Person: A Therapist's View of Psychotherapy


Autism and Asperger Syndrome


A Mood Apart : The Thinker's Guide to Emotion and Its Disorders


Amongst Ourselves : A Self-Help Guide to Living With Dissociative Identity
Disorder



Diagnostic Criteria from DSM-IV


Essential Psychopathology and Its Treatment


Bipolar Disorder: A Guide for Patients and Families


I Hate You-Don't Leave Me


Suicide and Attempted Suicide: Methods and Consequences


Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Among Us


Attention Deficit Disorder: A Different Perception


DSM-IV Made Easy: The Clinician's Guide to Diagnosis


An End to Panic: Breakthrough Techniques for Overcoming Panic Disorder


DSM-IV Casebook


The Boy Who Couldn't Stop Washing


The Broken Mirror : Understanding and Treating Body Dysmorphic Disorder


The Abusive Personality


Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds and Confusión de
Confusiones



The Suicidal Mind


Phantom Illness : Recognizing, Understanding, and Overcoming Hypochondria


Your Mental Health: A Layman's Guide to the Psychiatrist's Bible


Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry


Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions


Neuropsychological Assessment


Essential Psychopharmacology


Cults in Our Midst


ELECTROSHOCK: Restoring the Mind


Making Us Crazy


The Harvard Guide to Psychiatry


Clinical Assessment of Malingering and Deception


Kaplan & Sadock's Comprehensive Textbook of Psychiatry


Pocket Handbook of Clinical Psychiatry


A Guide to Treatments That Work


The Antidepressant Era


Handbook of Normative Data for Neuropsychological Assessment


Dual Diagnosis: Counseling the Mentally Ill Substance Abuser


Harm Reduction: Pragmatic Strategies for Managing High-Risk Behaviors


Juvenile Sexual Offending: Causes, Consequences, and Correction


Crisis Intervention Strategies


Clinician's Handbook, The: Integrated Diagnostics, Assessment, and
Intervention in Adult and Adolescent Psychopathology



Handbook of Clinical Psychopharmacology for Therapists


The Biochemical Basis of Neuropharmacology


The Psychotherapist's Guide to Psychopharmacology


Principles of Addiction Medicine


From Placebo to Panacea : Putting Psychiatric Drugs to the Test


The Behavioral Medicine Treatment Planner


Medicating Schizophrenia: A History


Principles and Practice of Psychopharmacotherapy


Drugs and Human Behavior


Drugs of Abuse and Addiction


The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy


Therapist's Guide to Clinical Intervention


Brief Therapy Homework Planner


The Couples Psychotherapy Treatment Planner


Brief Adolescent Therapy Homework Planner


The Harvard Medical School Guide to Suicide Assessment and Intervention


Anorexia, Murder, and Suicide


The Cruelest Death : The Enigma of Adolescent Suicide


Why We Get Sick : The New Science of Darwinian Medicine
by Randolph   Nesse, George Williams

Why We Get SickIs our tendency to "fix" our bodies with medicine keeping them from working exactly as they're supposed to? Two pioneers of the emerging science of Darwinian medicine argue that illness is part and parcel of the evolutionary system and as such, may be helping us to evolve towards better adaptation to our environment.

From Booklist , January 1, 1995
Although they realize that evolution selects not for health but for reproductive success, the Darwinian physicians of Nesse and Williams' trope see the body as "a bundle of careful compromises." These Darwinians also see trouble-causing genes as those that combine good and bad features because they have not adapted completely from their Stone Age purposes to the diverse demands of today's environment and ways of living. Physicians should look for the evolutionary, not the proximate, causes of disease, Darwinians say. For example, the gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, which is most often seen in malaria-ridden areas, actually protects the individual who has it from malaria (and now, apart from in areas endangered by malaria, this gene is decreasing in frequency). When physicians look at allergy, cancer, even mental diseases, through Darwinian eyes they see and, Nesse and Williams say, will increasingly see medical problems in a new and thought-provoking light. Why We Get Sick deserves pondering by both physicians and laypersons. William Beatty
Copyright© 1995, American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews , November 15, 1994
Some surprising answers to questions about why our bodies are designed the way they are and why we get the diseases we do. Nesse, a physician (Psychiatry/Univ. of Michigan) and Williams (Ecology and Evolution/SUNY, Stony Brook) first teamed up to write an article on Darwinian medicine, which applies the concept of adaptation by natural selection to medical questions. That article, published in 1991 in The Quarterly Review of Biology, has been expanded into the present book, in which the authors look at the design characteristics of the human body that make it susceptible to disease. Their conclusions? First, sometimes it's our genes that make us vulnerable to disease. Some genetic defects arise through mutations, but more often, genes with deleterious effects are maintained through natural selection because their benefits outweigh their costs. Second, there's a mismatch between our present environment and the one that over thousands of years shaped our hunter-gatherer ancestors. There simply hasn't been time for our bodies to adapt, and we suffer the consequences. Third, disease results from design compromises. For example, the structural changes that allowed us to develop from horizontal four-footed creatures to upright two-footed ones left us vulnerable to back problems. Fourth, our evolutionary history has left us some troublesome legacies, such as the unfortunate intersection in our throats of the passages for food and air. Some of the areas Nesse and Williams apply their Darwinian approach to are infectious diseases, allergies, cancer, aging, reproduction, and mental disorders. Happily, they write with impeccable clarity, and when they are speculating (which they do freely), they are careful to say so. They also offer numerous suggestions for research studies, thoughtful proposals for reshaping medical textbooks and medical education, and a scenario dramatizing Darwinian medicine's possible clinical application. Fascinating reading for doctors and patients alike. -- Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Edward O. Wilson, author of Naturalist
By bringing the evolutionary vision systematically into one of the last unconquered provinces, Nesse and Williams have devised not only means for the improvement of medicine but fundamental new insights into the human condition.

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Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers : An Updated Guide to Stress, Stress-Related Diseases, and Coping
by Robert M. Sapolsky

Why Zebras Don't Get UlcersWhy don't zebras get ulcers--or heart disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases--when people do? In a fascinating look at the science of stress, biologist Robert Sapolsky presents an intriguing case, that people develop such diseases partly because our bodies aren't designed for the constant stresses of a modern-day life--like sitting in daily traffic jams or growing up in poverty. Rather, they seem more built for the kind of short-term stress faced by a zebra--like outrunning a lion.

With wit, graceful writing, and a sprinkling of Far Side cartoons, Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers makes understanding the science of stress an adventure in discovery. "This book is a primer about stress, stress-related disease, and the mechanisms of coping with stress. How is it that our bodies can adapt to some stressful emergencies, while other ones make us sick? Why are some of us especially vulnerable to stress-related diseases, and what does that have to do with our personalities?"

Sapolsky, a Stanford University neuroscientist, explores stress's role in heart disease, diabetes, growth retardation, memory loss, and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis. He cites tantalizing studies of hyenas, baboons, and rodents, as well as of people of different cultures, to vividly make his points. And Sapolsky concludes with a hopeful chapter, titled "Managing Stress." Although he doesn't subscribe to the school of thought that hope cures all disease, Sapolsky highlights the studies that suggest we do have some control over stress-related ailments, based on how we perceive the stress and the kinds of social support we have.

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Dsm-IV Casebook : A Learning Companion to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
by Robert L. Spitzer, Miriam Gibbon, Andrew E. Skodol

DSM Case BookThe DSM IV Casebook facilitates the transition from the concepts and terms of the DSM IV to actual clinical situations by providing vignettes for illustration and study.

Booknews, Inc. , August 1, 1994
A collection of case accounts of real patients, edited to focus on information relevant to differential diagnosis. Each case is followed by a discussion of the differential diagnosis, made according to the diagnostic criteria in DSM-IV. The discussions include important diagnostic considerations, such as the rationale for making each particular diagnosis, other disorders to be considered in formulating each diagnosis, and, in some cases, recognition of diagnostic uncertainty because of inadequate information, ambiguity in the clinical features, or problems in the classification itself. Paper edition (675-9), $29.25. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

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Mind-Body Deceptions : The Psychosomatics of Everyday Life
by Steven L. Dubovsky

Mind Body DeceptionsFrom Kirkus Reviews , January 15, 1997
An ambitious and confoundingly uneven exploration of psychobiological interdependence. Dubovsky (Psychiatry and Medicine/Univ. of Colorado Medical School) is onto something--but not the rhetorically loaded ``deceptions'' of the title, into which frame the text is force-fit at some cost to clarity and credibility. The business of the book is examining mind-body connections and their implications for health and health care by explaining psychodynamic and biochemical actions and interactions and exposing prevailing misconceptions and their ramifications. It opens with padded conventional wisdom asserting the overlap of mental and physical processes, then usefully introduces the phenomena of somatization and psychosomatic illness as physiological expressions of emotional pain. In the gray area of depression, all ambiguities are veiled by a confident schematic rendering of the intimate correlation between mind and body systems at the level of the synapse: If maladaptive emotional behavior becomes automatic after repeated episodes of stress (a process known as ``kindling''), healthy brain circuits atrophy. That elucidation of brain biochemistry, like the descriptions of the workings of the cardiovascular and immunological systems in the later section on heart disease and cancer, presupposes a degree of scientific literacy discontinuous with the popular tenor and thrust of the psychological models and the casual assimilation of supportive research; the result is at once overtechnical and oversimplifying. Dubovsky writes sentiently, however, about psychosocial resources for medical patients, and saliently about how the managed-care industry both reflects and perpetuates the traditional mind-body dichotomy. At his judicious best--respecting the multiplicity of psychobiological events and responses, or cautioning against the very cognitive leaps he seems subtly prone to make--he does contribute to the substance and dimension of a fascinating discussion. For the shelf well-stocked with other perspectives. -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

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A History of Psychiatry : From the Era of the Asylum to the Age of Prozac
by Edward Shorter

A History of PsychiatryThe history of madness and its treatment is a fascinating one. At one time, the mentally ill were diagnosed as demonically possessed; later, when mental illness became the province of psychoanalysts, those conditions that are actually physical in nature, such as schizophrenia or manic depression, went insufficiently treated, their sufferers consigned to asylums. In his book, A History of Psychiatry, Edward Shorter, a medical historian at the University of Toronto, presents a concise chronology of mental illness and its treatment. Shorter favors a biological understanding of these disorders, concentrating on medical approaches to helping the seriously mentally ill. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

The New York Times Book Review, Vivian Dent
Biological psychiatry deserves a history that gives credit to its achievements; Mr. Shorter's book achieves this goal. But to the extent that psychiatry deals with both the physical and the psychological, and with their place in the social world, his book falls short. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

From Booklist , January 1, 1997
Shorter's social history of 200 years of psychiatry in the U.S., Great Britain, France, and Germany is informative and at times lively. It begins with the asylums of the eighteenth century, showing that they did some good until they were overwhelmed by increasing numbers of patients. The first round of biological psychiatry in the nineteenth century involved initial attempts to connect mental conditions with parts of the body; with this material Shorter does particularly well as he compares, in terms of both theories and treatments, the centralized national system of psychiatry in France with the separate institutes and private clinics in Germany. The nineteenth century also saw the emergence of patients' power when diagnoses of "madness" were refused and preference given those of various "nervous conditions." As for psychoanalysis, Shorter pillories it and then delineates the second round of biological psychiatry involving genetics and the growth of neuroscience. Dealing ably with the major trends, Shorter does not fail to also illuminate such engaging and horrifying byways as the "fever cure" and ice pick lobotomy. William Beatty
Copyright© 1997, American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

From Kirkus Reviews , December 1, 1996
An opinionated, anecdote-rich history of a branch of medicine strongly shaped by culture. Canadian physician and medical historian Shorter (Univ. of Toronto) begins his lively account by describing the horrific treatment of the mentally ill before the advent of the custodial asylum. It was, he says, the discovery that asylums could have a therapeutic role that led to the birth of psychiatry at the end of the 18th century. Shorter examines the failure of the therapeutic asylum movement, attributing it largely to an overwhelming number of inmates in the 19th century. Always divided by two visions of mental illness, one finding its origins in the biology of the brain and the other looking to psychosocial factors, psychiatry was dominated by the biological view throughout the 19th century. Shorter presents the German physician Emil Kraepelin, who revolutionized the approach to categorizing and diagnosing mental illnesses, as the central figure in ending the sway of biological psychiatry. As for Freud, says Shorter, ``His doctrine of psychoanalysis, based on intuitive leaps of fantasy, did not stand the test of time.'' Citing studies indicating that the majority of American psychoanalysts and their patients were Jewish, the author links the growing social assimilation of Jews (and their abandonment of their ``encapsulated little subculture'') with the post-'60s decline in popularity of psychoanalysis--a theory sure to arouse controversy. Shorter chronicles the discovery of the various drugs that formed the pharmacological basis of the new biological psychiatry and hails the alliance of psychiatrists with geneticists, biochemists, and other scientists that has brought the scientific method to the investigation of mental illness. Where does psychiatry go from here? Shorter predicts a combination of the neuroscientific and the psychotherapeutic, that is, a blend of ``neurochem'' and ``neurochat.'' While psychiatrists may quibble and Freudians and other psychoanalysts will surely squawk, those without a vested interest will be thoroughly entertained and certainly enlightened. -- Copyright ©1996, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

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Emotional Intelligence
by Daniel P. Goleman

Emotional IntelligenceThere was a time when IQ was considered the leading determinant of success. In this fascinating book, based on brain and behavioral research, Daniel Goleman argues that our IQ-idolizing view of intelligence is far too narrow. Instead, Goleman makes the case for "emotional intelligence" being the strongest indicator of human success. He defines emotional intelligence in terms of self-awareness, altruism, personal motivation, empathy, and the ability to love and be loved by friends, partners, and family members. People who possess high emotional intelligence are the people who truly succeed in work as well as play, building flourishing careers and lasting, meaningful relationships. Because emotional intelligence isn't fixed at birth, Goleman outlines how adults as well as parents of young children can sow the seeds.

Synopsis
The astounding coast-to-coast bestseller--with more than 750,000 copies in print--that has changed readers' understanding of what it really means to be smart, Emotional Intelligence delineates the five crucial skills of emotional intelligence and shows why these determine success in relationships, work, and even physical well-being. "Strikes a blow . . . for both science and common sense."--The Philadelphia Inquirer.

From the Publisher
Everyone knows that high IQ is no guarantee of success, happiness, or virtue, but until Emotional Intelligence, we could only guess why. Daniel Goleman's brilliant report from the frontiers of psychology and neuroscience offers startling new insight into our "two minds"--the rational and the emotional--and how they together shape our destiny.

Through vivid examples, Goleman delineates the five crucial skills of emotional intelligence, and shows how they determine our success in relationships, work, and even our physical well-being. What emerges is an entirely new way to talk about being smart.

The best news is that "emotional literacy" is not fixed early in life. Every parent, every teacher, every business leader, and everyone interested in a more civil society, has a stake in this compelling vision of human possibility.


Working With Emotional Intelligence
by Daniel P. Goleman

Working With Emotional IntelligenceWorking With Emotional Intelligence takes the concepts from Daniel Goleman's bestseller, Emotional Intelligence, into the workplace. Business leaders and outstanding performers are not defined by their IQs or even their job skills, but by their "emotional intelligence": a set of competencies that distinguishes how people manage feelings, interact, and communicate. Analyses done by dozens of experts in 500 corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations worldwide conclude that emotional intelligence is the barometer of excellence on virtually any job. This book explains what emotional intelligence is and why it counts more than IQ or expertise for excelling on the job. It details 12 personal competencies based on self-mastery (such as accurate self-assessment, self-control, initiative, and optimism) and 13 key relationship skills (such as service orientation, developing others, conflict management, and building bonds). Goleman includes many examples and anecdotes--from Fortune 500 companies to a nonprofit preschool--that show how these competencies lead to or thwart success.

Unlike IQ, emotional intelligence can keep growing--it continues to develop with life experiences. Understanding and raising your emotional intelligence is essential to your success and leadership potential. This book is an excellent resource for learning how to accomplish this. --Joan Price

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I Don't Want to Talk About It : Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression
by Terrence Real

I don't want to talk about itA therapist himself, Terrence Real examines the dirty little secret of the American Male: chronic depression. As the author sees it, men who fall prey to depressive disorders are caught in a double bind. Since their feelings of helplessness are considered unmanly, they tend to hide them, which makes the descent into blackness even steeper. The solution? Real urges men (and women!) to cast aside their clichéd notions of gender and to accept that feelings are neither masculine nor feminine but essentially human. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

Health and Fitness Editor's Recommended Book
When Terrence Real was studying to be a therapist, he accepted the notion that women suffered depression at rates several times that of men. Now he believes that conventional wisdom is wrong, that there has been a great cultural cover-up of depression in men. Real is convinced of the existence of a mental illness that is passed from fathers to sons in the form of rage, workaholism, distanced relationships from loved ones, and self-destructive behaviors ranging from stupid choices at work and in love to drug and alcohol abuse. Men reading I Don't Want to Talk About It will probably recognize themselves in every chapter, while women will recognize their partners--and, of course, both sexes will see their fathers in a new light.

The New York Times Book Review, Carol Gilligan
Mr. Real has the eye and ear of a novelist.... This is a hopeful and important book because it shows a way out of depression for men that carries with it a potential for ending a legacy of violence. --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

From Booklist , January 1, 1997
In our culture, men are supposed to be tough and stoic, revealing few emotions. But that is a facade, psychotherapist Real argues. Many men are suffering a great deal of pain, even to the point of depression, yet their very training as males keeps it hidden, forcing them into denial. Using case studies and examples from his own life, Real examines "covert depression," where men try to ease their pain through such abusive behaviors as overwork and alcoholism. He convincingly argues that covert depression is in fact a disease, even though the medical community has yet to recognize it as such. He then discusses the different traumas that might lead to covert depression, the disease's many manifestations, and ways to recognize it, face up to it, and begin to heal. Part self-help, part cultural critique, this useful book will also be a welcome addition to men's movement literature. Brian McCombie
Copyright© 1997, American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the hardcover edition of this title

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Our Babies, Ourselves : How Biology and Culture Shape the Way We Parent
by Meredith F. Small

Our Babies, OurselvesHow we raise our children differs greatly from society to society, with many cultures responding differently to such questions as how a parent should respond to a crying child, how often a baby should be nursed, and at what age a child should learn to sleep alone. Ethnopediatrics--the study of parents, children, and child rearing across cultures--is the subject of anthropologist Meredith F. Small's thorough and fascinating book Our Babies, Ourselves.

Small asserts that our ideas about how to raise our kids are as much a result of our culture as our biology, and that, in fact, many of the values we place on child-rearing practices are based in culture rather than biology. Small writes, "Every act by parents, every goal that molds that act, has a foundation in what is appropriate for that particular culture. In this sense, no parenting style is 'right' and no style is 'wrong.' It is appropriate or inappropriate only according to the culture." Our Babies, Ourselves is a wonderful read for anyone interested in the social sciences, and will be especially meaningful to those swept up in the wild adventure of parenting. --Ericka Lutz

Book Description
"In the winter of 1995, in a dimly lit room in Atlanta, Georgia, I witnessed a birth. Not the birth of a baby, but of a new science, ethnopediatrics." Thus begins Meredith Small's new, groundbreaking book on the study of parents and infants across cultures and the way different caretaking styes affect the health, well-being, and survival of infants. Pediatricians, child development researchers, and anthropologists today have turned their research efforts to studying this new science of why we parent our children the way we do.

Each culture, and often each family, offers advice and directives on the right and wrong way to raise and care for infants, from feeding, interaction, emotional support, sleeping, and more. Yet scientists are finding that what we are taught is the right way to parent our children is based on nothing more than cultural directives--and may even run directly counter to a baby's biological needs. Should a child be encouraged to sleep alone from an early age, as parents do here in the U.S.? Is breastfeeding better than bottlefeeding, or is that just the myth of the '90s? How frequently should children be nursed--or does it matter? Do children in all cultures develop colic? How do mothers in different cultures respond to a crying baby? And how important to our infants' ultimate development is it to talk, sing, and interact with them? These are but a few of the questions Meredith Small, through the research emerging from this new science, answers--and the answers are not only surprising, but may even change the way that we think and go about raising our children.

Written for general audiences and parents alike, Our Babies, Ourselves shows what makes us bring up our kids the way we do--and what is actually best for babies.

Card catalog description
"In the winter of 1995, in a dimly lit room in Atlanta, Georgia, I witnessed a birth. Not the birth of a baby, but of a new science, ethnopediatrics." Thus begins Dr. Meredith F. Small's new book on the study of parents and infants across cultures and the way different caretaking styles affect the health, well-being, and survival of infants. Each culture, and often each family, offers advice and directives on the right and wrong way to raise and care for infants, from feeding, interaction, and emotional support to mandating what is normal in terms of infant sleeping, crying, and more. Yet scientists are finding that what we are taught is the right way to parent our children is often based on nothing more than cultural tradition - and may even run counter to a baby's biological needs. Written for parents and science lovers alike, Our Babies, Ourselves shows what makes us bring up our kids the way we doand what is actually best for babies.

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Breaking the Patterns of Depression
by Michael D. Yapko

Breaking the Patterns of DepressionOffers depressives skills for understanding and ultimately averting the recurring cycles of depression, including more than one hundred structured activities that show how to solve problems and use self-knowledge to stay out of hurtful situations.

Psychologist Michael Yapko explains that in order to find relief, more than the current episode of depression must be examined. He presents skills that will help readers understand and ultimately avert depression's recurring cycles. Focusing on future prevention as well as initial treatment, the book includes over 100 structured activities to help suffers learn the skills necessary to becoming and remaining depression-free.

Card catalog description
Have you ever felt so depressed that you had trouble concentrating on your job, talking with your family, even getting out of bed? Twenty to thirty million Americans suffer from some form of diagnosable depression, and their ranks are growing. Psychologist Michael D. Yapko explains that in order to find relief, more than the current episode of depression must be examined. In Breaking the Patterns of Depression, he presents skills that will help you understand and ultimately avert depression's recurring cycles. Focusing on future prevention as well as initial treatment, the book includes over one hundred activities to help you learn the skills necessary for becoming and remaining depression-free. Realistic and enormously helpful, Breaking the Patterns of Depression allows you to recognize your triggers for depression and, best of all, to clarify what you can do about them. With this knowledge in hand, you can control your depression rather than having your depression control you.

Midwest Book Review
Clinical psychologist and depression expert Yapko provides the latest evidence that depression is more a product of learning than a biological reaction, and his book helps sufferers systematically diffuse patterns which contribute to and encourage depression. Over a hundred easy self-help exercises place the knowledge and ability to control depressions squarely in the sufferers' hands, exploring the problem-solving skills necessary to achieve control. Case history examples fuel discussions.

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