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Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

I was excited to see Bob Hinshelwood's comments about the analyst's interventions as tests of hypotheses. When at the Tavistock in the early 70s and supervised by Ezriel, Graham Davies and I were very taken by his clear model and looked into some of its philosophical implications (The logic of transference interpretation. Int. Rev. Psycho-Anal. (1976) 3, 55-64). After a 20 year detour into other kinds of clinical psychology, including research, I have now come back to psychoanalysis (thanks to the regional training scheme) and am very interested to see what has happened to that line of thought meanwhile. Langs, of course, has hypothesis testing built into his model and e.g. Britton and Steiner 1994. Interpretation: selected fact or over-valued idea? IJP 75, 1069-78 assume it. Ron Britton maintains that most analysts use a hypothesis testing model in their work, though it is rarely explicitly discussed. I wonder about this, given the confused, 'anything goes' nature of many discussions.

(Incidentally I question whether the serial nature of this hypothesis testing is as unusual as you maintain. For example, in the field of dog behaviour problems, the treatment of which for some years I tried to put on a scientific basis, you have to persuade vets and owners to undertake just such a process of serial testing. For example, if a dog barks in the night continually, this is often due to separation anxiety. The remedy is therefore to allow the dog in the bedroom, but this intervention is also a test of the diagnostic hypothesis. If it doesn't stop the barking, it produces further information which can give rise to another hypothesis: e.g. the dog continues to bark in the bedroom, but stops when the owner pays attention to it. The hypothesis then is that the barking is an attention seeking behaviour designed to reinforce the dog's dominance over the owner)

To get back to the main point, I would be very interested to hear of other views or references about this whole matter of hypothesis testing within the analytic session

Valerie O'Farrell
Edinburgh


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Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

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Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

I was excited to see Bob Hinshelwood's comments about the analyst's interventions as tests of hypotheses. When at the Tavistock in the early 70s and supervised by Ezriel, Graham Davies and I were very taken by his clear model and looked into some of its philosophical implications (The logic of transference interpretation. Int. Rev. Psycho-Anal. (1976) 3, 55-64). After a 20 year detour into other kinds of clinical psychology, including research, I have now come back to psychoanalysis (thanks to the regional training scheme) and am very interested to see what has happened to that line of thought meanwhile. Langs, of course, has hypothesis testing built into his model and e.g. Britton and Steiner 1994. Interpretation: selected fact or over-valued idea? IJP 75, 1069-78 assume it. Ron Britton maintains that most analysts use a hypothesis testing model in their work, though it is rarely explicitly discussed. I wonder about this, given the confused, 'anything goes' nature of many discussions.

(Incidentally I question whether the serial nature of this hypothesis testing is as unusual as you maintain. For example, in the field of dog behaviour problems, the treatment of which for some years I tried to put on a scientific basis, you have to persuade vets and owners to undertake just such a process of serial testing. For example, if a dog barks in the night continually, this is often due to separation anxiety. The remedy is therefore to allow the dog in the bedroom, but this intervention is also a test of the diagnostic hypothesis. If it doesn't stop the barking, it produces further information which can give rise to another hypothesis: e.g. the dog continues to bark in the bedroom, but stops when the owner pays attention to it. The hypothesis then is that the barking is an attention seeking behaviour designed to reinforce the dog's dominance over the owner)

To get back to the main point, I would be very interested to hear of other views or references about this whole matter of hypothesis testing within the analytic session

Valerie O'Farrell
Edinburgh


human-nature.com
Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

US -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.com logo

UK -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.co.uk logo

 | Human Nature | The Human Nature Daily Review | Psychiatry Research Online |