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Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

On 4/26/96 Bernard X. Bovasso wrote:

Today we face similar problems. Psychology is so often circumscribed to an extraspective description of behavior called responsivity", that if we attempt a teleological description of behavior, we are left without a technical terminology to do so. Persuading psychologists to accept this possibility is often the most difficult obstacle, because they are still entrenched in the Newtonian traditions of the far origins of Psychology. Freud's dilemma was how to state that the human mind acted for the sake of intentional ends, without contradicting Newtonian discourse.  It is quite impossible to describe intensive and extensive psychological states without sacrificing the predicative and prognostic element that the movement (causal element), representational (symbolic function)  and the telestic (final end) aspects of an energy (libido) hypothesis allows.

Where Freud may have erred was in defining this energy too narrowly by confining it to a concept of sexual energy, and thus limiting it to substantial description for the sake of causal reduction.

His hypostasis of the broad term of psychic energy to sexual libido has, however, somewhat obscured the telestic aspect which is intrinsic  to an understanding of energy, *per se.* It is thus gratifying, especially in defense of Dr. Freud, that you mentioned it.


Please correct me if I have a misunderstanding of Freud's work, but I was properly introduced to Freud's explanation of personality development and the libidinal theory only after I had been wooed by Cognitive Neuropsychology. Perhaps, then, my perspective was filtered through a paradigm that, as a young college student, I accepted with "hook, line, and sinker". When Freudian theory unfolded in my understanding, I was in awe of a genius, who, as I interpreted, deliberated an entire explanation of modern Neurocognitive theory from an "intuitive" reason. The core of this founding lore, being that theory of libido, in my framework seemed to correlate wonderfully with that of which Neurocognitive Theory purports as "arousal". Just as Freud devised the developmental stages of sexuality (grossly over-generalized I'm sure he must have thought to himself), modern neurocognition theory recognizes developmental growth and varying nuances of arousal. Arousal that is consequence to novel stimuli vs the replication of a previously experienced (and thusly associated) arousal with no concurrent stimuli pose the same frame work for my understanding as Freud's Conscious and Unconscious levels of the psyche. Therefore, believe that what has been described in terms that carry such connotative weight of subjectivity and, ergo, indefinability, are actually the same as that which is described today in terms of measurable physiological phenomenon. However, with the gaps of both time and language, we lose the conception of a brilliant work in the translation.

Sincerely,

Jeff Long
Houston, Texas

 


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Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

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 | Human Nature | The Human Nature Daily Review | Psychiatry Research Online |

Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

On 4/26/96 Bernard X. Bovasso wrote:

Today we face similar problems. Psychology is so often circumscribed to an extraspective description of behavior called responsivity", that if we attempt a teleological description of behavior, we are left without a technical terminology to do so. Persuading psychologists to accept this possibility is often the most difficult obstacle, because they are still entrenched in the Newtonian traditions of the far origins of Psychology. Freud's dilemma was how to state that the human mind acted for the sake of intentional ends, without contradicting Newtonian discourse.  It is quite impossible to describe intensive and extensive psychological states without sacrificing the predicative and prognostic element that the movement (causal element), representational (symbolic function)  and the telestic (final end) aspects of an energy (libido) hypothesis allows.

Where Freud may have erred was in defining this energy too narrowly by confining it to a concept of sexual energy, and thus limiting it to substantial description for the sake of causal reduction.

His hypostasis of the broad term of psychic energy to sexual libido has, however, somewhat obscured the telestic aspect which is intrinsic  to an understanding of energy, *per se.* It is thus gratifying, especially in defense of Dr. Freud, that you mentioned it.


Please correct me if I have a misunderstanding of Freud's work, but I was properly introduced to Freud's explanation of personality development and the libidinal theory only after I had been wooed by Cognitive Neuropsychology. Perhaps, then, my perspective was filtered through a paradigm that, as a young college student, I accepted with "hook, line, and sinker". When Freudian theory unfolded in my understanding, I was in awe of a genius, who, as I interpreted, deliberated an entire explanation of modern Neurocognitive theory from an "intuitive" reason. The core of this founding lore, being that theory of libido, in my framework seemed to correlate wonderfully with that of which Neurocognitive Theory purports as "arousal". Just as Freud devised the developmental stages of sexuality (grossly over-generalized I'm sure he must have thought to himself), modern neurocognition theory recognizes developmental growth and varying nuances of arousal. Arousal that is consequence to novel stimuli vs the replication of a previously experienced (and thusly associated) arousal with no concurrent stimuli pose the same frame work for my understanding as Freud's Conscious and Unconscious levels of the psyche. Therefore, believe that what has been described in terms that carry such connotative weight of subjectivity and, ergo, indefinability, are actually the same as that which is described today in terms of measurable physiological phenomenon. However, with the gaps of both time and language, we lose the conception of a brilliant work in the translation.

Sincerely,

Jeff Long
Houston, Texas

 


human-nature.com
Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

US -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.com logo

UK -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.co.uk logo

 | Human Nature | The Human Nature Daily Review | Psychiatry Research Online |