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Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

Thanks to those who made this article accessible, it was interesting material. I don't see too much point in detailed critical commentary; I doubt that the author would accept any but a positivist approach to clinical practice. I might remind the writer that non-psychoanalytic psychiatry has not been exactly a humanitarian bed of roses and bliss during the 20th Century.

What intrigues me, though is the area of complete agreement: I concur that psychoanalysis is at one level a Gnostic reoccurrence. In fact, I strongly identify. The quote in Elaine Pagels' quote of Jesus from the Gospel of Thomas:

"If you bring forth what is in you, what you bring forth will save you". If you do not bring forth what is within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you"

is a wonderful conceptualization of the therapeutic purpose. Clearly, Gnosticism is heterodox; it's primary concordance (again per Pagels) is the rejection of apparency, of the "creator god's" explanation of things. These days, we would say, of the perniciousness of positivistic "value neutrality" as, in fact, tyranny.

Of course, the Gnostics were persecuted throughout history. The obvious struggle in which Tallis is engaged, that of (unconsciously) exhuming and projecting a hate-object, gives one pause.

Jonanthan Ames

 


human-nature.com
Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

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 | Human Nature | The Human Nature Daily Review | Psychiatry Research Online |

Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

Thanks to those who made this article accessible, it was interesting material. I don't see too much point in detailed critical commentary; I doubt that the author would accept any but a positivist approach to clinical practice. I might remind the writer that non-psychoanalytic psychiatry has not been exactly a humanitarian bed of roses and bliss during the 20th Century.

What intrigues me, though is the area of complete agreement: I concur that psychoanalysis is at one level a Gnostic reoccurrence. In fact, I strongly identify. The quote in Elaine Pagels' quote of Jesus from the Gospel of Thomas:

"If you bring forth what is in you, what you bring forth will save you". If you do not bring forth what is within you, what you do not bring forth will destroy you"

is a wonderful conceptualization of the therapeutic purpose. Clearly, Gnosticism is heterodox; it's primary concordance (again per Pagels) is the rejection of apparency, of the "creator god's" explanation of things. These days, we would say, of the perniciousness of positivistic "value neutrality" as, in fact, tyranny.

Of course, the Gnostics were persecuted throughout history. The obvious struggle in which Tallis is engaged, that of (unconsciously) exhuming and projecting a hate-object, gives one pause.

Jonanthan Ames

 


human-nature.com
Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

US -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.com logo

UK -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.co.uk logo

 | Human Nature | The Human Nature Daily Review | Psychiatry Research Online |