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Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

In a message dated 96-04-22 19:23:31 EDT, Jonathan Ames writes:

Sure -- death is certainly a threat to humanity. I think "control" per se -- rather than control of a particular object, is the erotic involved, in contrast to "connect", or "uncover". The eros/thanatos consideration, vis a vis psa, "burying Freud", etc. hadn't occurred to me. Intriguing -- thanks.


Jonathan:
The point I was also making, especially that you brought it up, was the connection of a concept of Death to a concept of Insanity. Both, insofar as they are complementary to Eros make up as a problematical bi-polarity. Would this suggest that the erotic component is an antithesis to Death/Insanity but which does not negate their inscrutable unity? Or said otherwise: where Eros is exoterically object seeking Death/Insanity is esoterically subject seeking. But no sooner the object is attained and overcome than the withdrawal and *recorso* takes place in the direction of the unconscious. Could it be that the need for "burying Freud" is the expression of an unconscious "death wish," or a predilection to enter the unconscious? Psychologically speaking, this may indicate an obdurate repression (of unconscious content) and by which libido would be compulsively directed inwardly. Or expressed Oedipally; the slaying of the father (as object world) for a plunge into the mother, remembering Nietzsche's call for (a Dionysian, or compulsive) plunge into what he called the "realm of the mothers" after he did in the Apollonian Ideal and thus killed what he called the *principium individuationus," i.e., the paternal ideal of self-unification. But this amounted to a personality dissolution and virtual death of the ego (Death qua insanity).

Bernard X. Bovasso


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Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

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Burying Freud

[ Burying Freud Homepage | Freud's Seduction Theory Homepage ]

In a message dated 96-04-22 19:23:31 EDT, Jonathan Ames writes:

Sure -- death is certainly a threat to humanity. I think "control" per se -- rather than control of a particular object, is the erotic involved, in contrast to "connect", or "uncover". The eros/thanatos consideration, vis a vis psa, "burying Freud", etc. hadn't occurred to me. Intriguing -- thanks.


Jonathan:
The point I was also making, especially that you brought it up, was the connection of a concept of Death to a concept of Insanity. Both, insofar as they are complementary to Eros make up as a problematical bi-polarity. Would this suggest that the erotic component is an antithesis to Death/Insanity but which does not negate their inscrutable unity? Or said otherwise: where Eros is exoterically object seeking Death/Insanity is esoterically subject seeking. But no sooner the object is attained and overcome than the withdrawal and *recorso* takes place in the direction of the unconscious. Could it be that the need for "burying Freud" is the expression of an unconscious "death wish," or a predilection to enter the unconscious? Psychologically speaking, this may indicate an obdurate repression (of unconscious content) and by which libido would be compulsively directed inwardly. Or expressed Oedipally; the slaying of the father (as object world) for a plunge into the mother, remembering Nietzsche's call for (a Dionysian, or compulsive) plunge into what he called the "realm of the mothers" after he did in the Apollonian Ideal and thus killed what he called the *principium individuationus," i.e., the paternal ideal of self-unification. But this amounted to a personality dissolution and virtual death of the ego (Death qua insanity).

Bernard X. Bovasso


human-nature.com
Ian Pitchford and Robert M. Young - Last updated: 28 May, 2005 02:29 PM

US -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.com logo

UK -
 Search:
Keywords:  

Amazon.co.uk logo

 | Human Nature | The Human Nature Daily Review | Psychiatry Research Online |